You are browsing the archive for sexually transmitted diseases.

Study: HPV vaccine doesn’t encourage sexual activity

November 13, 2012 in Grand Forks Herald

HPV is known to be the cause of a number of illnesses, including mouth and throat cancer, genital warts and cervical cancer. Since 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended that all girls ages 11 and 12 receive the HPV vaccine to protect themselves. Continue Reading

OUR VIEW: Time for ‘the talk’ in wake of STD rise in state

August 28, 2012 in The Daily Republic

As we read that sexually transmitted diseases are rising in Davison County and throughout South Dakota, we cannot help but suggest to parents the one thing that many tend to dread: The talk. Continue Reading

AVOIDING STDS

August 25, 2012 in The Daily Republic

The South Dakota Department of Health gives these tips to avoid sexually transmitted diseases. Continue Reading

Syphilis cases reported in eastern South Dakota

June 29, 2012 in The Daily Republic

PIERRE (AP) South Dakota health officials are asking doctors to be alert for syphilis cases after reports of 10 cases in the eastern part of the state.
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Study: Docs overtesting for cervical cancer virus

June 21, 2011 in Grand Forks Herald

Too many doctors are testing the wrong women, or using the wrong test, for a virus that causes cervical cancer.The days of one-size-fits-all screening for cervical cancer are long gone. How often to get a Pap smear _ and whether to be tested for the cancer-causing HPV virus at the same time _ now depend on your age and other circumstances. But a government study reports Monday that a surprising number of doctors and clinics aren’t following guidelines from major medical groups on how to perform HPV checks, suggesting a lot of women are getting unnecessary tests.
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Surge in sexually transmitted disease cases alarms Minnesota health officials

April 6, 2011 in Grand Forks Herald

Reportable STDs in Minnesota include chlamydia (kla-MID’-ee-ah), gonorrhea and syphilis. They rose to a new high of 17,760 in Minnesota in 2010. That’s 848 cases more than 2009. Continue Reading